.crǝɐtor.ॐ.sǝʞoi.

ॐ Powerful. Creative. Spiritual. Intimidating. Artistic. Loving. Passionate.

Born in Atlanta, raised around the world.

I spent the early portion of my childhood in the Bay Area (CA) and Ghana Accra (Africa). Then continued most of my childhood in Ithaca (NY).

I've been privileged enough to have traveled all around the world, participate in Environmental and Social Justice work, meet Amazing people and follow the journey of who I want to be.

My Blog features everything I find important, beautiful, and spiritual, while reflecting my artistic interests.

Peace, Sequoya.

"I need less alcohol and more books."
Weekend reflections
"Think of what starlight
And lamplight would lack
Diamonds and fireflies
If they couldn’t lean against Black…"
Mary O’Neill, from “What is Black,” Hailstones and Halibut Bones (Doubleday, 1989)
"I dream about beautiful women, and their lips."
sekoi
concentrated-effort:

The Renaissance WOman, Tribeca NYC, May 2014
"And then my soul saw you and it kind of went
“Oh there you are. I’ve been looking for you.”"
Iain Thomas, The Point of Contact (via larmoyante)
I love me a sappy romance movie, so I shall vent.
ZoomInfo
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
asylum-art:

Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Saltscapes
Japanese artist Motoi Yamamoto sees more uses in salt than the ordinary person. His artwork stems from the death of his sister, who passed away at a young age from brain cancer. In Japanese culture there is an idea of throwing salt over yourself after you attend a funeral acts as a sort of cleansing. So Yamamoto started using salt as his medium, creating intricate labyrinths and mazes as he calls them. Not only does Motoi create intricate patterns but full scale installations as well.
There’s also a beautiful book by Motoi that showcases some of his art called Return to the Sea: Saltscapes by Motoi Yamamoto.
Watch the video:
"Love your body. It may be just a shell for the soul. But all things that grow need love."
S.A.S (via empressmarley)
keepasecretslut:

€
"Learn to value yourself, which means: fight for your happiness."
Ayn Rand (via feellng)